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Miss USA 2018: Who Took Home the Sexist Crown?!?

Two days after Great Britain gave folks a look behind the lives of those involved with its crown, the United States went ahead and did something similar.

Kind of. Sort of. In a way, we guess.

America went ahead and crowned a new Miss USA.

While it seems unfathomable that such a contest still exists in the year 2018, especially as the #MeToo movement grows stronger and people finally realize that women are more than sexual objects, the competition really did air on Monday night.

And a lovely young women with huge boobs, a great body and a not totally asinine answer to a very broad and dumb question came out on top.

Congratulations, Sarah Rose Summers!

Indeed, Miss Nebraska was turned into Miss USA 2018 yesterday evening at the Hirsch Memorial Coliseum in Shreveport-Bossier, Louisiana.

After competing hard against 50 other women, Sarah Rose Summers impressed the judges with her brains, beauty and skill set.

Early in the show, for example, the busty blonde was asked to speak on the fact that one in four children in the United States live in single parent households.

How has that affected our generation’s views on marriage and family? she was asked.

(To be clear, this question is not dumb at all, as we mentioned above. It’s a very important problem. But it’s ridiculous to ask of beauty pageant contestants who are then given under a minute to respond.)

“I am so grateful to have grown up in a home with two parents,” Summer said, adding in profound detail:

“And so I can’t personally relate to this.

“However, I do work in children’s hospital as a certified child life specialist where I’m a liaison between the children and families and the medical team and I’ve seen single mothers at the bedside working remotely on their computers to stay by their children and support them.

“And I think that it just shows that children – no matter if it’s a boy or a girl – that they can do that.”

Summers also strutted across the stage at one point in a bikini:

For Summers, her final scenario was picturing herself on the way to a march or a protest and then someone hands her a blank sign and a marker.

What do you write on her sign and why?

She answered:

I say speak your voice. I don’t know what march we’re on our way to in this hypothetical situation, but no matter where you’re going, whatever type of march it is, you’re obviously on your way to that march because you care about that cause so go speak to people.

When they have questions, communicate with them. Listen to their views also.

That is one thing in the United States that we really need to focus on is listening to each other!

Please check out the following photo while we slam our heads against our desks for the next 30 seconds…

For the first time ever, this year’s Miss USA selection committee was comprised of all female entrepreneurs, business leaders and industry experts.

They included  former Miss USA contestants and members were:

  • Today show contributor Lilliana Vazquez
  • HLN host Natasha Curry
  • Founder/CEO of IT Cosmetics Jamie Kern Lima

That’s great and all.

But such a panel does not make a beauty contest any less antiquated or sexist.

Still: Congrats to Sarah Rose Summers!

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Matt Roloff Roasted by Fans: You Took Credit for Amy’s Idea!

Little People, Big World star Matt Roloff has found himself in a bit of a pickle. Over pumpkin salsa.

See, he recently celebrated the Roloff Farm Pumpkin Salsa being more prominently displayed in select grocery stores.

But fans say that there’s a problem: it’s Amy’s salsa, and he’s claiming credit for it now that it’s a success.

Amidst worry that he will leave Roloff Farms, Matt took to social media for a happy announcement:

“Tori and Jackson pointed out last week at @toriroloff … our Roloff Farm Pumpkin salsa has been promoted to right smack dab in the middle of the store in the All Natural area… (at markets in our area).”

This, he says, is great news for fans who are looking to taste it.

“No more spending hours trying to find it.”

For other stores that aren’t putting it on prominent display, he suggests that people can request it.

“If it’s not already at your local store be sure to ask for at any @krogerco brand store.”

Kroger is America’s largest grocery store chain.

“It’s delicious and healthy!”

All of that sounds great!

(Especially the pumpkin salsa itself, honestly)

But fans noticed one particular detail about that post.

“I remember the show during pumpkin season where Amy had to dress up like a honeybee because you told her that HER salsa wasn’t selling and she had to do something to promote it.”

Every fandom’s memory is long. That is certainly true for reality fans.

“Funny to see that you refer to it as OUR salsa now”

Another fan wrote:

“The salsa was prepared by Amy, and Matt wanted to take over … then all of a sudden he started calling it our salsa.”

That person continues:

“As usual, he wanted all the credit for himself, and when it was a success, he changed his mind.”

That fan is not wrong.

Even as they were in the process of divorcing — remember when Matt was living in a double-wide trailer? — Matt and Amy disagreed over salsa.

Matt, as fans have seen over the years and as Amy reminded fans on the Little People, Big World season premiere, likes to dive headfirst into each project.

He doesn’t pace himself, and can sometimes go overboard. That probably worked out well for him when he worked in Silicon Valley. That isn’t always good for relationships, however.

In turn, he becomes frustrated when he sees someone else’s project moving along at a slower pace.

Even aside from the chicken incident to which the commenter refers, Matt expressed a number of doubts about Amy’s salsa project.

And, for a long time, it really did seem that he was just leaving it to Amy.

Matt’s enthusiastic fans weren’t going to take that criticism without a fight.

“Without Matt there wouldn’t be a Roloff Farms of any kind! Like it or not Matt made Roloff Farms practically on his own.”

That seems a little beside the point to some.

“He’s had almost every vision that is there today.”

Hmmm.

“Matt might not have made the salsa, but he knows how to market it.”

Either way, he and Amy did work on it together. So calling it our salsa is probably fair.

Perhaps some fans wish that he’d put more faith in Amy in the past, but he can’t change that now.

Honestly, pumpkin makes for a fantastic ingredient in salsa.

For anyone interested (I have to say, i was pretty curious), you can get their pumpkin salsa from Fred Meyer, QFC, and Roth’s Fresh Markets.

And, of course, at some Kroger locations — Kroger owns Fred Meyer.

If you’re looking to order it online because it’s 2018 and that’s how most of us do most of our shopping anyway, Roth’s gives you the option to order some online.

That’s not an endorsement — we have no idea how it tastes. But we figured that some folks probably got a little curious as they were reading the #salsagate discourse.

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Grammys 2018: Who Took Home the Gold?

The Grammy Awards turned 60 years old on Sunday night.

Hosted by James Corden, the annual ceremony aired live from Los Angeles and, like always, honored the very best in the music business.

60th grammys

Which male singer dominated the evening?

Who was crowned Best New Artist?

Which winner was the most controversial choice?

Scroll down for a complete look at everyone who took home a trophy at the 2018 Grammy Awards…

Record of the Year: “24K Magic” — Bruno Mars

Album of the Year: “24K Magic” — Bruno Mars

Song of the Year: “That’s What I Like” — Christopher Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy, Philip Lawrence, Bruno Mars, Ray Charles McCullough II, Jeremy Reeves, Ray Romulus and Jonathan Yip, songwriters (Bruno Mars)

Best New Artist: Alessia Cara

Best Pop Solo Performance: “Shape of You” — Ed Sheeran

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance: “Feel It Still” — Portugal. The Man

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album: “Tony Bennett Celebrates 90” — Various Artists; Dae Bennett, producer

Best Pop Vocal Album: “÷” — Ed Sheeran

Best Dance Recording: “Tonite” — LCD Soundsystem

Best Dance/Electronic Album: “3-D The Catalogue” — Kraftwerk

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album: “Prototype” — Jeff Lorber Fusion

Best Rock Performance: “You Want It Darker” — Leonard Cohen

Best Metal Performance: “Sultan’s Curse” — Mastodon

Best Rock Song: “Run” — Foo Fighters, songwriters

Best Rock Album: “A Deeper Understanding” — The War on Drugs

Best Alternative Music Album: “Sleep Well Beast” — The National

Best R&B Performance: “That’s What I Like” — Bruno Mars

Best Traditional R&B Performance: “Redbone” — Childish Gambino

Best R&B Song: “That’s What I Like” — Christopher Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy, Philip Lawrence, Bruno Mars, Ray Charles McCullough II, Jeremy Reeves, Ray Romulus and Jonathan Yip, songwriters (Bruno Mars)

Best Urban Contemporary Album: “Starboy” — The Weeknd

Best R&B Album: “24K Magic” — Bruno Mars

Best Rap Performance: “HUMBLE.” — Kendrick Lamar

Best Rap/Sung Performance: “LOYALTY.” — Kendrick Lamar featuring Rihanna

Best Rap Song: “HUMBLE.” — K. Duckworth, Asheton Hogan and M. Williams II, songwriters (Kendrick Lamar)

Best Rap Album: “DAMN.” — Kendrick Lamar

Best Country Solo Performance: “Either Way” — Chris Stapleton

Best Country Duo/Group Performance: “Better Man” — Little Big Town

Best Country Song: “Broken Halos” — Mike Henderson and Chris Stapleton, songwriters (Chris Stapleton)

Best Country Album: “From a Room: Volume 1” — Chris Stapleton

Best New Age Album: “Dancing on Water” — Peter Kater

Best Improvised Jazz Solo: “Miles Beyond” — John McLaughlin, soloist

Best Jazz Vocal Album: “Dreams and Daggers” — Cécile McLorin Salvant

Best Jazz Instrumental Album: “Rebirth” — Billy Childs

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album: “Bringin’ It” — Christian McBride Big Band

Best Latin Jazz Album: “Jazz Tango” — Pablo Ziegler Trio

Best Gospel Performance/Song: “Never Have to Be Alone” — CeCe Winans; Dwan Hill & Alvin Love III, songwriters

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song: “What a Beautiful Name” — Hillsong Worship; Ben Fielding & Brooke Ligertwood, songwriters

Best Gospel Album: “Let Them Fall in Love” — CeCe Winans

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album: “Chain Breaker” — Zach Williams

Best Roots Gospel Album: “Sing It Now: Songs of Faith & Hope” — Reba McEntire

Best Latin Pop Album: “El Dorado” — Shakira

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album: “Residente” — Residente

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano): “Arriero Somos Versiones Acústicas” — Aida Cuevas

Best Tropical Latin Album: “Salsa Big Band” — Rubén Blades con Roberto Delgado y Orquesta

Best American Roots Performance: “Killer Diller Blues” — Alabama Shakes

Best American Roots Song: “If We Were Vampires” — Jason Isbell, songwriter (Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit)

Best Americana Album: “The Nashville Sound” — Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit

Best Bluegrass Album: tie, “Laws of Gravity” — The Infamous Stringdusters and “All the Rage — In Concert Volume One” — Rhonda Vincent and the Rage

Best Traditional Blues Album: “Blue & Lonesome” — The Rolling Stones

Best Contemporary Blues Album: “TajMo” — Taj Mahal and Keb’ Mo’

Best Folk Album: “Mental Illness” — Aimee Mann

Best Regional Roots Music Album: “Kalenda” — Lost Bayou Ramblers

Best Reggae Album: “Stony Hill” — Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley

Best World Music Album: “Shaka Zulu Revisited: 30th Anniversary Celebration” — Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Best Children’s Album: “Feel What U Feel” — Lisa Loeb

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books and Storytelling): “The Princess Diarist” — Carrie Fisher

Best Comedy Album: “The Age of Spin/Deep in the Heart of Texas” — Dave Chappelle

Best Musical Theater Album: “Dear Evan Hansen” — Ben Platt, principal soloist; Alex Lacamoire, Stacey Mindich, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, producers; Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, composers/lyricists (original Broadway cast recording)

Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media: “La La Land” — Various Artists

Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media: “La La Land” — Justin Hurwitz, composer

Best Song Written for Visual Media: “How Far I’ll Go” — Lin-Manuel Miranda, songwriter (Auli’i Cravalho)

Best Instrumental Composition: “Three Revolutions” — Arturo O’Farrill, composer (Arturo O’Farrill and Chucho Valdés)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella: “Escapades for Alto Saxophone and Orchestra From ‘Catch Me If You Can’” — John Williams, arranger (John Williams)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals: “Putin” — Randy Newman, arranger (Randy Newman)

Best Recording Package: tie, “Pure Comedy (Deluxe Edition)” — Sasha Barr, Ed Steed and Josh Tillman, art directors (Father John Misty) and “El Orisha de la Rosa” — Claudio Roncoli and Cactus Taller, art directors (Magín Díaz)

Best Boxed or Special Limited-Edition Package: “The Voyager Golden Record: 40th Anniversary Edition” — Lawrence Azerrad, Timothy Daly and David Pescovitz, art directors (Various Artists)

Best Album Notes: “Live at the Whisky A Go Go: The Complete Recordings” — Lynell George, writer (Otis Redding)

Best Historical Album: “Leonard Bernstein — The Composer” — Robert Russ, compilation producer; Martin Kistner and Andreas K. Meyer, mastering engineers (Leonard Bernstein)

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical: “24K Magic” — Serban Ghenea, John Hanes and Charles Moniz, engineers; Tom Coyne, mastering engineer (Bruno Mars)

Producer of the Year, Non-Classical: Greg Kurstin

Best Remixed Recording: “You Move (Latroit Remix)” — Dennis White, remixer (Depeche Mode)

Best Surround Sound Album: “Early Americans” — Jim Anderson, surround mix engineer; Darcy Proper, surround mastering engineer; Jim Anderson and Jane Ira Bloom, surround producers (Jane Ira Bloom)

Best Engineered Album, Classical: “Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5; Barber: Adagio” — Mark Donahue, engineer (Manfred Honeck and Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)

Producer of the Year, Classical: David Frost

Best Orchestral Performance: “Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5; Barber: Adagio” — Manfred Honeck, conductor (Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)

Best Opera Recording: “Berg: Wozzeck” — Hans Graf, conductor; Anne Schwanewilms and Roman Trekel; Hans Graf and Brad Sayles, producers (Houston Symphony; Chorus of Students and Alumni, Shepherd School of Music, Rice University and Houston Grand Opera Children’s Chorus)

Best Choral Performance: “Bryars: The Fifth Century” — Donald Nally, conductor (PRISM Quartet and The Crossing)

Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance: “Death & the Maiden” — Patricia Kopatchinskaja and the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra

Best Classical Instrumental Solo: “Transcendental” — Daniil Trifonov

Best Classical Solo Vocal Album: “Crazy Girl Crazy” — Barbara Hannigan (Ludwig Orchestra)

Best Classical Compendium: “Higdon: All Things Majestic, Viola Concerto & Oboe Concerto” — Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor; Tim Handley, producer

Best Contemporary Classical Composition: “Viola Concerto” — Jennifer Higdon, composer (Roberto Díaz, Giancarlo Guerrero and Nashville Symphony)

Best Music Video: “HUMBLE.” — Kendrick Lamar

Best Music Film: “The Defiant Ones” — Various Artists

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